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The Dictionary of Sydney’s latest tea towels are now available!

Featuring a beautiful engraved advertisement by John Carmichael for confectioner William Blyth that appeared in Francis Low’s Directory of the city and district of Sydney in 1847,  these tea towels measure 70x50cm and are printed with non-toxic water-based Permaset inks on 100% white cotton by Arcade Screen Printing in St Peters, Sydney.

Choose between the bright blue or a refined charcoal.

$27.50 (including GST and postage within Australia)

Buy online via a secure credit card facility here

Contact us to organise a quote for shipping outside Australia.

Every purchase helps to support the Dictionary of Sydney!

 

About the image

Scottish migrant Francis Low compiled his first general directory of Sydney in 1844, pledging to make it “as ample and as accurate as practicable”. After publishing a second edition in 1847 he returned to Scotland, with the apparent intention of encouraging migration from the Highlands of Scotland to Sydney.

While inclusion in the directories was free, people could pay for a larger insertion, or, as in the case of William Blyth, for a full page advertisement.

The beautiful engraving for the advertisements was done by John Carmichael, a Scottish artist and engraver who arrived in Sydney in 1825 as a professional artist. Deaf and mute, his exquisite work graced many of Sydney’s printed materials, including New South Wales’ first stamp

Pastry cook and confectioner William Blyth had arrived in Sydney in 1833 with another confectioner Thomas Dunsdon and his family, and they set up business together in George Street. In 1839 Blyth married Dunsdon’s sister Hephzibah and took over the business in his own right. He opened the refreshment rooms next to the Victoria Theatre in 1843, selling pastries, superior and richly ornamented cakes, ice cream, turtle soup, jams and jellies of every description, bottled fruits of all kinds, preserved ginger in jars, candied chocolate in tins, pink and white sugar candy and every description of confectionery, as well as catering for routs and parties.

In 1850 Blyth sold the business and established an Italian grocery at Haymarket. After this the family appear to have followed the gold rush to Ballarat, where in 1859 Blyth’s daughter Sarah Jane married Francis Low’s son John Christie, and there was, presumably, rich bride cake for all.

Advertisement for W Blyth, Cook, Pastry Cook and Wholesale & Retail Confectioner, engraved by John Carmichael, from Low's Directory of the city and district of Sydney for MDCCCXLVII, Sydney 1847, opp p 19. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria (RARELT 058.944 L95) https://dictionaryofsydney.org/media/58359

Advertisement for W Blyth, Cook, Pastry Cook and Wholesale & Retail Confectioner, engraved by John Carmichael, from Low’s Directory of the city and district of Sydney for MDCCCXLVII, Sydney 1847, opp p 19. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria (RARELT 058.944 L95) https://dictionaryofsydney.org/media/58359

 

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