BROWSE


Soldier’s Riot of 1916

The soldiers of the Australian Imperial Force who fought in WW1 are usually remembered as heroic and patriotic. But they weren’t always compliant to military rule and were prone to cause trouble, both here and overseas. Conditions in the recruitment camps at... read more

Colonial scandal and murder

There is nothing like reading about a colourful historical figure to remind ourselves how rich and complicated our society actually is. This week I was struck by the story of Robert Wardell. The name might seem a little bit familiar to you. Wardell Road in... read more

– NEW – Download units of study linked to the Australian history curriculum here.

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DECEMBER NEWSLETTER

Catch up on our December newsletter here including reviews of some of the best books from 2015.

Author Jacqui Newling with her new book, Eat Your HIstory: A Shared Table, at Vaucluse House, Sydney. Photograph by Jenny McInerney.

Pic: Author Jacqui Newling with her new book, Eat Your HIstory: A Shared Table, at Vaucluse House, Sydney. Photograph by Jenny McInerney.

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Have you checked out the The State Library of New South Wales's store on Redbubble?

There are some gorgeous products made from images especially curated from the Library's magnificent collections, including this new addition to the set.


Love can be difficult to navigate. That's why you need a 'Map of the Provinces of Courtship & Matrimony'. This beautiful handmade valentine by J Knapp from 1831 includes all the shoals, rocks, quick sands and the dangerous places love can take you.

If you would like to have your very own 'Love Map' on a cup, bag, tote and more, visit our Red Bubble store here: www.redbubble.com/people/madewithslnsw/works/20900336-love-map?c=489584-love-map
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Love can be difficult to navigate. That's why you ...

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It eats bluebottles!
The Australian Museum's Search & Discover team receive daily enquiries from curious people seeking the identity of an odd or scary or stunning creature they have never seen before.
This is one example.
Melissa photographed this extraordinary creature in one of the rock pools at Freshwater Beach in Sydney.
The Search & Discover team identified it as a Blue Sea Slug, Glaucus atlanticus, which is often called a ‘Blue Dragon’. Blue Sea Slugs belong to a group of molluscs called Nudibranchs.
Melissa told us she spotted it near Bluebottles, and there is a very good reason why! This species is a predator of Bluebottles, Physalia spp. and feed on their tentacles. Interestingly, the nematocysts (stinging cells) on these tentacles pass through the Blue Sea Slug intact. The sea slug can then use these stinging cells in its own defence!
Have you snapped something mysterious? Contact Search & Discover, and it may even find it posted here ---> australianmuseum.net.au/connect-with-us
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The talented team at Search & Discover receive dai...

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Did you know you can create lists in Trove to collect newspaper articles or other items you find in Trove? As long as you have registered with Trove and are logged in, you can save what you find to a list.

To find out how you can do this, watch this video. They also have information in their Help on lists: help.nla.gov.au/trove/using-trove/creating-contributing/lists

#Trovetips
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Trove: creating and using lists

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Detail from MS Hill's 1888 map 'The City of Sydney',  a birds-eye view over the city looking to the south and west across Darling Harbour. http://dictionaryofsydney.org/image/97526

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